Five things you need to know about CSIRO enterprise bargaining

With CSIRO bargaining discussions  due to commence soon, the Staff Association has produced printed materials that sum up the key developments and issues so far.

Five things you need to know about CSIRO enterprise bargaining

  1. CSIRO Executive are thinking about not bargaining
  2. Avoiding bargaining is a bad idea
  3. The Science Minister says that bargaining is a matter for CSIRO, not the Government
  4. Negotiations cannot start until CSIRO Executive chooses to start bargaining
  5. Being and becoming a Staff Association member is crucial

Poster

  • Members are encouraged to download the poster, print at A3 and put it up on noticeboards or other suitable work spaces.

Flyer 

  • Download and print a copy of the flyer (with membership form on the reverse side) and speak to a colleague about joining the Staff Association today.

Five things you need to know about CSIRO enterprise bargaining

  • 1) CSIRO Executive are thinking about not bargaining

Spurred on by the Federal Government, CSIRO Executive have raised the possibility of a ‘rollover’ of pay and conditions with the Staff Association. In some Australian Public Service (APS) agencies, this ‘rollover’ is explicitly being used to avoid bargaining. Section 32 of the Science and Industry Research (CSIRO) Act states that ‘the terms and conditions of service of officers appointed under this section are such as are determined by the Chief Executive.’ As a result, Larry Marshall could determine pay and conditions at CSIRO, without bargaining with staff for a new agreement.

  • 2) Avoiding bargaining is a bad idea

Bargaining enables a fully enforceable, new agreement to be put in place. Negotiations occur on a range of matters and staff ultimately determine the outcome. Although a determination by a Chief Executive could appear to be tempting, the power to revoke any or all pay rises; coupled with the possible loss of enforceable working conditions due to the existing agreement expiring and being terminated; are fundamental threats to future guaranteed pay and conditions. A determination requires no consultation with staff. The Staff Association is opposed to Larry Marshall and the Executive avoiding bargaining.

  • 3) The Science Minister says that bargaining is a matter for CSIRO, not the Government

The Staff Association wrote to the Minister for Science Karen Andrews, formally requesting that the Government’s bargaining policy not apply to CSIRO. In response, the Minister stated that ‘…my office and the department do not have responsibility for such policies, and I suggest that you contact CSIRO directly to discuss further.’ The Staff Association has contacted CSIRO Executive to commence bargaining negotiations, independent of Government, in November this year.

  • 4) Negotiations cannot start until CSIRO Executive chooses to start bargaining

Under the Fair Work Act, bargaining commences when ‘the employer agrees to bargain, or initiates bargaining for the agreement’. As a result, the Staff Association’s objective is to put maximum pressure on Larry Marshall and the Executive to initiate bargaining early in order to achieve a new agreement before the current agreement expires on 14 November 2020.

  • 5) Being and becoming a Staff Association member is crucial

The Staff Association will achieve the best outcome by applying pressure on Larry Marshall and the Executive. This means having a large and active membership. If you are not yet a member, support better pay and conditions by joining today. Email csstaff@cpsu.org.au for more information or call (03) 8620 6348.

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