CSIRO restructure

The plan to overhaul CSIRO’s organisational structure have been months in the making and represent the biggest structural shake-up in more than a decade.

new structure banner

Background

Management’s decision to implement a new structure followed a sustained campaign – led by Staff Association members – to improve workforce productivity by removing the Matrix management system, introduced at CSIRO in 2004.

Under management’s proposal, divisions will be abolished and replaced by nine flagship homes – agricultural productivity, future manufacturing, digital productivity and services, energy, mineral resources, oceans and atmosphere, food and nutrition, land and water, and biosecurity – operating under the ‘Impact Science’ operational line.

Additional operational and business lines will include National Facilities and Commercial Services. Enterprise processes and support functions are also set to be streamlined.

Management have commenced a process of mapping CSIRO staff to positions in the new structure. This process is expected to be completed by the time the new organisational arrangements take effect on 1 July 2014.

Based on information provided by CSIRO Management, the Staff Association have compiled a comprehensive table listing (where specified by CSIRO Management) the positions affected. This table can be viewed here.

More jobs under threat

Despite initial assurances that the restructure process would be used as cover for significant job cuts, management have now confirmed that three hundred positions may go, with support roles likely to bear the most pain.

Download a poster for the workplace

Download a poster

The Staff Association is strongly opposed to these latest round of job cuts – following hard on the heels of heavy losses to both ongoing and contract positions.

Over the past nine months, CSIRO’s total workforce has already shrunk by nearly 400 positions, the worst reduction in more than a decade.

If the estimated job losses from the restructure are realised, than CSIRO could end the year with eleven per cent less staff, based on 2013 levels.

Assistance for members

The Staff Association is committed to protecting jobs at CSIRO and assisting members in the workplace.

  • Management have committed to regular, fortnightly meetings with Staff Association representatives to discuss the implementation of the new structure. It’s important that the  questions and opinions of staff are properly heard, members are invited to email their contributions to csstaff@cpsu.org.au
  • Members of the Staff Association receive individual advice and support to ensure their workplace rights are protected. This includes ensuring that relevant consultation, redeployment and redundancy processes are lawfully observed.
  • The Staff Association also continues to make the public case for a sustainable and well-resourced CSIRO that can continue to deliver innovation and research in the national interest. This includes resisting any cuts to funding that may arise as part of the Federal Government’s Commission of Audit or Budget processes.

Join today

If you’re not yet a member, join the Staff Association today. For more information about membership, email csstaff@cpsu.org.au, call (03) 8620 6348 or speak to your local Staff Association delegate.

More information

Additional resources

Have your say

What do you think of the proposed restructure? Are you satisfied with the information provided by management? Do you share the Staff Association’s concerns about further CSIRO job cuts?

Join the discussion by posting a comment below.

2 thoughts on “CSIRO restructure

  1. Hi. Since the IOR Strategy document is labelled CSIRO-In-Confidence should it be available on this public site?

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